Posts Tagged ‘MRI’

I met a new friend not too long ago. And she’s already moving away. (She was here for work, short-term.) A mutual friend hooked us up, as she’s also an active person with MS. We got to chatting recently–she’s a few years younger than I am, and was diagnosed at a much earlier age than […]


mri and ms

01Mar15

Marching forward into a new month! Spring is almost here–hooray! Continuing with my series on education about MS: part of our diagnosis (and continued monitoring) is through magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI. Why, and how? Well, those of us with MS have damage to the myelin sheath–the protective layer around our nerves. This is composed […]


A few days ago, I saw my MS specialist for an update after my recent MRIs (there was some concern that I may have had a minor relapse without knowing it). But–ends up that my MRI hasn’t changed a bit. I haven’t had any new MS activity! (I guess my bad days are just that–bad […]


If you have MS or another brain disorder, you probably know the drill with routine long MRIs (or, technically, a series of MRIs, between various parts of the nervous system and with/without contrast dye). Worse yet, when the cervical spine (neck) is being scanned, we’re told not to swallow, so that the image stays clear. […]


Why?? you ask. Last I saw my MS specialist, as well as my regular primary care, for my headaches (which were pretty darn out of control), they both suggested I see a locally-renowned headache specialist at University of Washington. She’s supposedly hard to get into, but has insight like no other, I’m told. (Wonder if […]


Our bodies are fantastic teachers. And I’m gaining more and more awareness of this the more time I spend with multiple sclerosis. I can tell you more about MS than many practitioners in the field… For instance, it occurred to me during a recent weight training session that I probably have an unmapped lesion, in […]


Out of curiosity, I’m often going around finding stories of how people found out they have MS. It usually starts with an oddball symptom (blurry vision in one eye, weakness on one side) coming out of nowhere. You think it’s a temporary nerve problem… and when your doctor tells you it’s MS, and that you […]